Diverticular Disease Natural Remedy: Go Vegetarian

Diverticular Disease

If you find yourself suffering from diverticular disease or constipation, then consider adopting a vegetarian diet as a way of effectively combating these conditions naturally. When you are constipated, you can stress the lining of the lower digestive tract, causing parts of the lining to form external pouches called diverticuli.

These pouches can be medically risky because they collect stool and bacteria and can cause infections such as diverticulitis. The infected diverticuli act similar to appendicitis and can rupture if not treated effectively.

Diverticular Disease and Constipation Improve with Change in Diet

Those who follow a vegetarian diet tend to eat a large amount of high fiber foods like beans, lentils, whole fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. The soluble fiber is helpful because it attracts more water into the colon so that stools are softer and pass through the digestive system easier.

Researchers have determined that a diet high in fiber from plant based foods support healthy bacteria in the gut. Too many people with constipation or other gastrointestinal complaints are chronically troubled because of unhealthy bacteria in the system.

When you replace unhealthy bacteria with healthy ones, the gut no longer has to deal with the toxins produced by unhealthy bacteria or the gas that these kinds of bacteria make as part of their own metabolism. Your stools should be easier to pass with less gas and bloating.

Vegetarian Foods Actually Reduce Diverticulitis

The foods you eat as a vegetarian, particularly those with a lot of fiber, will trap particles that are otherwise indigestible and will prevent these particles from blocking the opening to the diverticuli. You lessen your risk of bacteria becoming stuck in the diverticular pouches consequently infecting the area, causing pain, fever, and inflammation.

Soluble fiber in a plant based diet can be found in oats, other grains, and beans. These, fortunately, make up a good portion of a vegetarian diet. Vegetarians, because of their dietary habits, tend to have a healthier digestive tract, which prevents diverticular blockage and subsequent infection that can become systemic and very serious.

Vegetarianism Can Increase The Rate Of Stool Passage

Vegetarian diets often contain a great deal of insoluble fiber that comes from the sturdier parts of certain plants, such as broccoli, asparagus, and cauliflower. Insoluble fiber is not digested and therefore is passed through the body as bulk waste. Bulkier stools stimulate the lower digestive system so that the stools move through the colon faster, preventing straining and secondary diverticular disease.

This means that vegetables and fruits in a vegetarian diet should be in their natural, uncooked state as much as possible. Uncooked vegetables contain solid fiber that will bind with other indigestible plant-derived molecules causing the best rate of stool passage, particularly in the colon, which represents the lower part of the bowels. This means less straining while having a bowel movement, reducing the risk of getting diverticuli and diverticulitis.

Foods To Eat For Best Digestive Health

As mentioned earlier, eat a vegetarian diet that is in its raw, natural state as much as possible. Some of the best raw fruits and vegetables to eat include:

  • Carrots
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Cauliflower
  • Whole apples
  • Whole plums
  • Whole pears
  • Whole peaches
  • Citrus fruits

Fiber is in the whole plant so you don’t get the full benefit from highly cooked vegetarian foods or juices. Consider using a blender to make smoothies instead of using a juicer as this method retains the fiber in the raw produce making this type of juice as healthy for you as the entire fruit or vegetable.

As you switch to a plant based diet, you’ll be amazed at how much natural healing for diverticular disease and constipation will take place over time as well as how much better you’ll feel.

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